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The Fine Art of Homemade Vinaigrettes

Homemade Vinaigrettes-2

When ever we entertain and have guests over for dinner, I am always surprised at how impressed our friends are with our homemade salad dressings. I guess everyone’s tastes buds have been fried by all the preservatives and flavorings in store-bought vinaigrettes nowadays, because mine are not “delicacies.” Or at least we don’t think so! Our salad dressings are super easy to make and are extremely healthy to eat, so that’s why we do it. Maybe they are more “fancy” than I used to think. I’ll let you be the judge. 🙂

Types of Vinegar

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Before I share my recipes, we need to “talk vinegars” for a minute. Certainly not all vinegars are created equal and some are flat-out horrible for you.

White Distilled Colorless and sharp, white vinegar is made by the acid fermentation of distilled alcohol – distilled from assorted grains. We use this for cleaning and washing fruit and vegetables from the store.

Apple Cider VinegarMade from apples that are fermented, it has a slightly fruity flavor and a strong bite. The best quality of apple cider vinegar is raw and unfiltered. This strong, clear, brown vinegar holds up well with pungent greens and is especially good in marinades. Cider vinegar is the best all-around choice for everything especially terrific in cold rice or pasta salads.

Red or white wine vinegar РMade from any number of red or white wines, this vinegar is full bodied and perfect for dressing pungent, dark greens. Wine vinegars are ideal for mayonnaise and all kinds of salad dressings. They are also used in many classic butter sauces, such as b̩arnaise, often made with white wine vinegar and served with fish. A dash of fine wine vinegar adds distinction to rich meat or game stews. Wine vinegars are made from fermented grapes. The quality usually depends on the type of grape used. Wine Vinegars are quite similar to wines, coming with flavors like red wine, rice wine, white wine, and many more.

Balsamic – A dark, sweet, syrupy vinegar. Use it on salads, in sauces, or drizzled over fresh fruit.

“This extraordinary, wine-based vinegar is still made in the northern part of Italy just as it has been for centuries. It is a mellow, sweet-and-sour vinegar with a heady fragrance. It must, by law, be aged for a decade in a variety of kegs made of particular kinds of wood; some batches are aged much longer. The vinegar is transferred from red oak kegs to chestnut, mulberry and juniper in turn, mellowing at each stage. Eventually, a warm, red-brown color and incredible fragrance are achieved. As a result, the taste is very special. The vinegar can be used in salads, sprinkled on cold meats or over hot vegetables, or to deglaze a pan. We even use it to douse our dessert fruits – an intoxicating habit.”

This is an excerpt from “THE SILVER PALATE COOKBOOK”, by Julee Rosso and Sheila Lukins with Michael McLaughlin , Workman Publishing, New York.1982.

Following are the recipes for our favorite salad dressings:

Basic Vinaigrette Recipe

  • 1/4 cup Herbal or Bragg Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 1 cup olive oil
  • 1 raw egg or 1/2 Tablespoon Egg Replacer + 1⁄4 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon favorite herb blend (Italian or Herbs de Provence is great)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Put vinegar in blender. As blender is running, slowly add oil in a steady stream. Blend well. Add egg. Mix until well blended. Add yogurt, salt and pepper and more or less vinegar depending on flavor preference.

Cream Vinaigrette Recipe

  • 1/4 cup Herbal or Bragg Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 1 cup olive oil
  • 1 raw egg or 1/2 Tablespoon Egg Replacer + 1⁄4 cup water + 3 tablespoons coconut milk yogurt
  • 1 teaspoon Herbs de Provence
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Put vinegar in blender. As blender is running, slowly add oil in a steady stream. Blend well. Add egg. Mix until well blended. Add yogurt, salt and pepper and more or less vinegar depending on flavor preference.

Sweet Vinaigrette Recipe

  • 3 oz. fresh fruit
  • 1/4 cup Herbal or Bragg Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 1 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 Tablespoon Egg Replacer + 1⁄4 cup water + 2 Tablespoons honey
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Add poppy seeds or mint if desired

Put fruit and vinegar in blender. Puree. While blender is running, slowly add oil in a steady stream. Blend well. Add Egg Beaters and mix until well blended. Add honey, salt, pepper and more or less vinegar depending on flavor preference. Serve over fruit salad or mixed green with fresh fruit and flowers.

How about you? What are YOUR favorite vinaigrette recipes?

Need something to put the vinaigrette on? Check out some of our favorite salad recipes!

 


This post currently has 11 comments.

  1. Terri
    May 12, 2016

    I add turmeric and crushed garlic in my lemon vinegrette too. Figured I might as well kill cancer too????.

      Reply
    • Dr. Z
      May 13, 2016

      What a great idea! Thanks for sharing!!

        Reply
  2. Sabrinassabrina
    May 12, 2016

    Thank you for these recipes! 🙂
    I’ve read that white vinegar contains derivatives from GMO corn. Do you know anything about that?
    I’m sure it’s fine to clean with, but wasn’t sure about ingesting it.

      Reply
    • Dr. Z
      May 13, 2016

      Yeah, white vinegar is bad news bears. Totally not safe for ingestion. Good to clean with, but not consume…

        Reply
  3. Sharon Thornal
    May 12, 2016

    I’ve always been told it isn’t safe to eat raw eggs. Why do all dressings even mayonnaise home made have raw eggs?

      Reply
    • Dr. Z
      May 18, 2016

      All I can say is Rocky Balboa! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhkdLHSKo9s 😉

      People consume raw eggs in dressings, raw cookie dough, and batter all the time. I take the precaution to make sure that the egg shells are clean before cracking them to help ensure no E. coli infection.

        Reply
  4. Jan Burnett
    April 11, 2016

    What would you make to replace Hidden Valley Ranch dressing??

      Reply
    • Dr. Z
      April 11, 2016

      We don’t have a ranch recipe on our website yet, but coming soon!

        Reply
  5. Kymberli Norman
    April 10, 2016

    Verifying that the eggs are raw/uncooked?

      Reply
    • Dr. Z
      April 11, 2016

      Raw. Sorry about that – just updated the recipe. 🙂

        Reply
  6. Iris
    April 5, 2016

    How much yogurt?

      Reply

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